At The Beat The Time Will Be… 11/11/11 11:11:11

11/11/11 11:11:11

This is providing that my Atomic Clock is correct.

Image Detail

Clocks that do not lose time

Scientists have developed laser clocks that can keep time without missing a beat in nearly two billion years. They are so precise that
they could lead eventually lead to automated cars.

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) based in Boulder, Colorado have developed an advanced clock which measures the vibrations of electrons in mercury ions and go 1.7 billion years without missing a beat.
Atomic Clock NBS-2 (1960)
 The new clocks are known as optical clocks and use lasers to measure the frequency with which electrons in atoms vibrate. Currently the most accurate clocks are known as atomic clocks which can measure to an accuracy of one second over 80 million years. As a comparison a
normal wristwatch will lose around 15 seconds a month.
The international committee for weights and measures is planning to replace its atomic clocks with optical ones by 2020.
Scientists believe that installing optical clocks on satellites they will be able to track objects within less than a metre leading to automated motorway driving or landing an aircraft without human intervention.
Historical accuracy of atomic clocks from NIST.
The European Space Agency has said that they are considering fitting an optical clock to a satellite as part of its cosmic vision programme. This programme will run from 2015 to 2025 exploring ways of using space for scientific advancement.
Scientists in Britain, US, Germany, France and Japan are now competing to make a clock more powerful time so accurately that it will not have lost a second since the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago. They believe this clock will be built within a decade.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/266848#ixzz1clGW5a9m

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Video: New Atomic Clock Reaches A 100 Quadrillionth Of A Second Accuracy

by Serkan Toto  From TechCrunch.com

A team of researchers at the University of Tokyo has developed a new type of optical atomic clock that boasts a 100 quadrillionth of a second accuracy (one quadrillion has 15 zeros). The optical lattice clock is the brain child of Professor Katori who says his device observes a million atoms simultaneously whereas conventional atomic clocks measure time by using single atoms.

The Professor explains:

“(…) if one clock is placed one centimeter higher than another clock, the higher clock is affected by less gravity, so it goes faster. That difference could be read out in the 18th decimal place of the clocks in one second averaging time. Until now, clocks have been thought of as tools for sharing a common time. But with clocks like this, conversely, we can understand that time passes at different speeds, depending on the time and place a clock is at.”

The idea is to eventually use the new clock to improve GPS (which is based on atomic clocks delivering 14-or 15-digit accuracy) or to predict earthquakes, for example.

This video (shot by Diginfonews in Tokyo, in English) provides more insight:

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Twisted Design: Telling Time With Toys and Bluetooth

 From Gajitz

Who knew that watching a clock work could be so hypnotizing? The Tilted Twister clock from Hans Andersson is composed of two Lego Minstorm bricks connected by Bluetooth. The master brick is in charge of tracking the time and operating the minute digits. The slave brick is responsible for moving the seconds indicator and the hour digits.

Watching the time change ever so slowly from one minute to the next is a surprisingly entertaining venture. The digits all consist of five layers of black and white tiles. The tiles are twisted around by the top layer until they form the appropriate digit.

Staring at the video of this awesome clock is one thing, but it’s so loud that it would probably be a huge pain to live with. Still, it might be worth the irritation just to have such a unique and artful timepiece keeping you grounded in reality.

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On This Date: November 11th

Nov 11, 1918:

World War I ends

At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the Great War ends. At 5 a.m. that morning, Germany, bereft of manpower and supplies and faced with imminent invasion, signed an armistice agreement with the Allies in a railroad car outside Compiégne, France. The First World War left nine million soldiers dead and 21 million wounded, with Germany, Russia, Austria-Hungary, France, and Great Britain each losing nearly a million or more lives. In addition, at least five million civilians died from disease, starvation, or exposure.

World War I Memorial 13.jpg

Victoria Belanger via Flickr

On June 28, 1914, in an event that is widely regarded as sparking the outbreak of World War I, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire, was shot to death with his wife by Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Ferdinand had been inspecting his uncle’s imperial armed forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina, despite the threat of Serbian nationalists who wanted these Austro-Hungarian possessions to join newly independent Serbia. Austria-Hungary blamed the Serbian government for the attack and hoped to use the incident as justification for settling the problem of Slavic nationalism once and for all. However, as Russia supported Serbia, an Austro-Hungarian declaration of war was delayed until its leaders received assurances from German leader Kaiser Wilhelm II that Germany would support their cause in the event of a Russian intervention.

On July 28, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, and the tenuous peace between Europe’s great powers collapsed. On July 29, Austro-Hungarian forces began to shell the Serbian capital, Belgrade, and Russia, Serbia’s ally, ordered a troop mobilization against Austria-Hungary. France, allied with Russia, began to mobilize on August 1. France and Germany declared war against each other on August 3. After crossing through neutral Luxembourg, the German army invaded Belgium on the night of August 3-4, prompting Great Britain, Belgium’s ally, to declare war against Germany.

For the most part, the people of Europe greeted the outbreak of war with jubilation. Most patriotically assumed that their country would be victorious within months. Of the initial belligerents, Germany was most prepared for the outbreak of hostilities, and its military leaders had formatted a sophisticated military strategy known as the “Schlieffen Plan,” which envisioned the conquest of France through a great arcing offensive through Belgium and into northern France. Russia, slow to mobilize, was to be kept occupied by Austro-Hungarian forces while Germany attacked France.

The Schlieffen Plan was nearly successful, but in early September the French rallied and halted the German advance at the bloody Battle of the Marne near Paris. By the end of 1914, well over a million soldiers of various nationalities had been killed on the battlefields of Europe, and neither for the Allies nor the Central Powers was a final victory in sight. On the western front—the battle line that stretched across northern France and Belgium—the combatants settled down in the trenches for a terrible war of attrition.

In 1915, the Allies attempted to break the stalemate with an amphibious invasion of Turkey, which had joined the Central Powers in October 1914, but after heavy bloodshed the Allies were forced to retreat in early 1916. The year 1916 saw great offensives by Germany and Britain along the western front, but neither side accomplished a decisive victory. In the east, Germany was more successful, and the disorganized Russian army suffered terrible losses, spurring the outbreak of the Russian Revolution in 1917. By the end of 1917, the Bolsheviks had seized power in Russia and immediately set about negotiating peace with Germany. In 1918, the infusion of American troops and resources into the western front finally tipped the scale in the Allies’ favor. Germany signed an armistice agreement with the Allies on November 11, 1918.

World War I was known as the “war to end all wars” because of the great slaughter and destruction it caused. Unfortunately, the peace treaty that officially ended the conflict—the Treaty of Versailles of 1919—forced punitive terms on Germany that destabilized Europe and laid the groundwork for World War II.

Also on This Day

American Revolution
Poor leadership leads to Cherry Valley Massacre, 1778
Automotive
The General Lee jumps into history, 1978
Civil War
Confederate General Benjamin McCulloch is born, 1811
Cold War
Soviet Union refuses to play Chile in World Cup Soccer, 1973
Crime
Police make a grisly discovery in Dorothea Puente’s lawn, 1988
Disaster
Skiers die in cable-car fire, 2000
General Interest
Nat Turner executed in Virginia, 1831
George Patton born, 1885
Dedication of the Tomb of the Unknowns, 1921
Hollywood
Interview with the Vampire debuts, 1994
Literary
Louisa May Alcott publishes her first story, 1852
Music
Donna Summer earns her first #1 pop hit with “MacArthur Park”, 1978
Old West
Massive dust storm sweeps South Dakota, 1933
Presidential
Franklin Pierce marries Jane Appleton, 1834
James Garfield marries Lucretia Rudolph, 1858
Sports
Fernando Valenzuela wins Cy Young Award, 1981
Vietnam War
Viet Cong release U.S. prisoners of war, 1967
Operation Commando Hunt commences, 1968
Long Binh base turned over to South Vietnam, 1972
World War I
World War I ends, 1918
World War II
Draft age is lowered to 18, 1942

This Week in History, Nov 11 – Nov 17

Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends
Nov 12, 1954
Ellis Island closes
Nov 13, 1982
Vietnam Veterans Memorial dedicated
Nov 14, 1851
Moby-Dick published
Nov 15, 1867
First stock ticker debuts
Nov 16, 1532
Pizarro traps Incan emperor Atahualpa
Nov 17, 1558
Elizabethan Age begins

The Marines Special Day

Nov 10, 1775:

Birth of the U.S. Marine Corps

Marine Corps Birthday During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that “two Battalions of Marines be raised” for service as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. president John Adams and adopted in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps.

Serving on land and at sea, the original U.S. Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations during the Revolutionary War. The first Marine landing on a hostile shore occurred when a force of Marines under Captain Samuel Nicholas captured New Province Island in the Bahamas from the British in March 1776. Nicholas was the first commissioned officer in the Continental Marines and is celebrated as the first Marine commandant. After American independence was achieved in 1783, the Continental Navy was demobilized and its Marines disbanded.

oil on canvas depiction of the Battle of Nassau

In the next decade, however, increasing conflict at sea with Revolutionary France led the U.S. Congress to establish formally the U.S. Navy in May 1798. Two months later, on July 11, President John Adams signed the bill establishing the U.S. Marine Corps as a permanent military force under the jurisdiction of the Department of Navy. U.S. Marines saw action in the so-called Quasi-War with France and then fought against the Barbary pirates of North Africa during the first years of the 19th century. Since then, Marines have participated in all the wars of the United States and in most cases were the first soldiers to fight. In all, Marines have executed more than 300 landings on foreign shores.

Sketch of Tun Tavern in the Revolutionary War,...

Today, there are more than 200,000 active-duty and reserve Marines, divided into three divisions stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; Camp Pendleton, California; and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one or more expeditionary units, ready to launch major operations anywhere in the world on two weeks’ notice. Marines expeditionary units are self-sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery, and air forces. The motto of the service is Semper Fidelis, meaning “Always Faithful” in Latin.

A big Happy Birthday and Semper Fi to all my jarhead brothers out there.-Bloggo

On This Date- November 9th

Nov 9, 1938:

Nazis launch Kristallnacht

On this day in 1938, in an event that would foreshadow the Holocaust, German Nazis launch a campaign of terror against Jewish people and their homes and businesses in Germany and Austria. The violence, which continued through November 10 and was later dubbed “Kristallnacht,” or “Night of Broken Glass,” after the countless smashed windows of Jewish-owned establishments, left approximately 100 Jews dead, 7,500 Jewish businesses damaged and hundreds of synagogues, homes, schools and graveyards vandalized. An estimated 30,000 Jewish men were arrested, many of whom were then sent to concentration camps for several months; they were released when they promised to leave Germany. Kristallnacht represented a dramatic escalation of the campaign started by Adolf Hitler in 1933 when he became chancellor to purge Germany of its Jewish population.

Berlin's Fasanenstrasse synagogue after Krista...

The Nazis used the murder of a low-level German diplomat in Paris by a 17-year-old Polish Jew as an excuse to carry out the Kristallnacht attacks. On November 7, 1938, Ernst vom Rath was shot outside the German embassy by Herschel Grynszpan, who wanted revenge for his parents’ sudden deportation from Germany to Poland, along with tens of thousands of other Polish Jews. Following vom Rath’s death, Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels ordered German storm troopers to carry out violent riots disguised as “spontaneous demonstrations” against Jewish citizens. Local police and fire departments were told not to interfere. In the face of all the devastation, some Jews, including entire families, committed suicide.

In the aftermath of Kristallnacht, the Nazis blamed the Jews and fined them 1 billion marks (or $400 million in 1938 dollars) for vom Rath’s death. As repayment, the government seized Jewish property and kept insurance money owed to Jewish people. In its quest to create a master Aryan race, the Nazi government enacted further discriminatory policies that essentially excluded Jews from all aspects of public life.

The aftermath of Kristallnacht, Jewish shops v...

Over 100,000 Jews fled Germany for other countries after Kristallnacht. The international community was outraged by the violent events of November 9 and 10. Some countries broke off diplomatic relations in protest, but the Nazis suffered no serious consequences, leading them to believe they could get away with the mass murder that was the Holocaust, in which an estimated 6 million European Jews died.

Also on This Day

American Revolution
Sumter evades Wemyss in South Carolina, 1780
Automotive
Robert McNamara becomes president of Ford Motor Company, 1960
Civil War
Burnside assumes command of the Union Army of the Potomac, 1862
Cold War
East Germany opens the Berlin Wall, 1989
Crime
A Sunday school teacher murders his family and goes undercover for 18 years, 1971
Disaster
Fire rips through Boston, 1872
General Interest
Roosevelt travels to Panama, 1906
Nazis suppressed in Munich, 1923
Sartre renounces communists, 1956
The Great Northeast Blackout, 1965
Hollywood
Kodak Theatre, new home of Oscars, opens, 2001
Literary
Best-selling Millennium trilogy author Stieg Larsson dies at 50, 2004
Music
Willie Nelson’s assets are seized by the IRS, 1990
Old West
Followers of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse identified as hostile, 1875
Presidential
Teddy Roosevelt establishes a naval base in the Philippines, 1901
Sports
Army and Notre Dame fight to a draw, 1946
Vietnam War
Antiwar protestor sets himself afire, 1965
Captain Lance Sijan shot down over North Vietnam, 1967
Supreme Court refuses to rule on legality of Vietnam War, 1970
World War I
Australian warship Sydney sinks German Emden , 1914
World War II
“The Night of Broken Glass”, 1938

This Week in History, Nov 9 – Nov 15

 

Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht
Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts
Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends
Nov 12, 1954
Ellis Island closes
Nov 13, 1982
Vietnam Veterans Memorial dedicated
Nov 14, 1851
Moby-Dick published
Nov 15, 1867
First stock ticker debuts

On This Date: November 8th

Nov 8, 1895:

German scientist discovers X-rays

On this day in 1895, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen (1845-1923) becomes the first person to observe X-rays, a significant scientific advancement that would ultimately benefit a variety of fields, most of all medicine, by making the invisible visible. Rontgen’s discovery occurred accidentally in his Wurzburg, Germany, lab, where he was testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass when he noticed a glow coming from a nearby chemically coated screen. He dubbed the rays that caused this glow X-rays because of their unknown nature.

X-ray image of the paranasal sinuses, lateral ...

X-rays are electromagnetic energy waves that act similarly to light rays, but at wavelengths approximately 1,000 times shorter than those of light. Rontgen holed up in his lab and conducted a series of experiments to better understand his discovery. He learned that X-rays penetrate human flesh but not higher-density substances such as bone or lead and that they can be photographed.

Rontgen’s discovery was labeled a medical miracle and X-rays soon became an important diagnostic tool in medicine, allowing doctors to see inside the human body for the first time without surgery. In 1897, X-rays were first used on a military battlefield, during the Balkan War, to find bullets and broken bones inside patients.

Scientists were quick to realize the benefits of X-rays, but slower to comprehend the harmful effects of radiation. Initially, it was believed X-rays passed through flesh as harmlessly as light. However, within several years, researchers began to report cases of burns and skin damage after exposure to X-rays, and in 1904, Thomas Edison’s assistant, Clarence Dally, who had worked extensively with X-rays, died of skin cancer. Dally’s death caused some scientists to begin taking the risks of radiation more seriously, but they still weren’t fully understood. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, in fact, many American shoe stores featured shoe-fitting fluoroscopes that used to X-rays to enable customers to see the bones in their feet; it wasn’t until the 1950s that this practice was determined to be risky business. Wilhelm Rontgen received numerous accolades for his work, including the first Nobel Prize in physics in 1901, yet he remained modest and never tried to patent his discovery. Today, X-ray technology is widely used in medicine, material analysis and devices such as airport security scanners.

Also on This Day

American Revolution
Washington seeks to make militias into a military, 1775
Automotive
Sun sets on the Ford Rotunda, 1962
Civil War
President Lincoln is re-elected, 1864
Cold War
John F. Kennedy elected president, 1960
Crime
Ted Bundy botches an abduction attempt, 1974
Disaster
Hurricane Gordon is born, 1994
General Interest
Louvre Museum opens, 1793
Beer Hall Putsch begins, 1923
The Republican Revolution, 1994
Hollywood
Dracula creator Bram Stoker born, 1847
Literary
Margaret Mitchell is born, 1900
Music
Salvatore “Sonny” Bono is elected to the U.S. Congress, 1994
Old West
Doc Holliday dies of tuberculosis, 1887
Presidential
FDR broadcasts message to Vichy France leader Marshal Petain, 1942
Sports
Yogi Berra is the AL MVP, 1951
Vietnam War
Lawrence Joel earns Medal of Honor, 1965
World War I
New Russian leader Lenin calls for immediate armistice, 1917
World War II
Hitler survives assassination attempt, 1939

This Week in History, Nov 8 – Nov 14

Nov 08, 1895
German scientist discovers X-rays
Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht
Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts
Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends
Nov 12, 1954
Ellis Island closes
Nov 13, 1982
Vietnam Veterans Memorial dedicated
Nov 14, 1851
Moby-Dick published

On This Date: November 7th

Nov 7, 1991:

Magic Johnson announces he is HIV positive

On this day in 1991, basketball legend Earvin “Magic” Johnson stuns the world by announcing his sudden retirement from the Los Angeles Lakers, after testing positive for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. At the time, many Americans viewed AIDS as a gay white man’s disease. Johnson (1959- ), who is African American and heterosexual, was one of the first sports stars to go public about his HIV-positive status.

Los Angeles Lakers Magic Johnson and Boston Ce...

Revered as one of the greatest basketball players of all time, Johnson spent his entire 13-season NBA career with the Lakers, helping them to win five championships in the 1980s. The 6’9″ point guard, a native of Lansing, Michigan, was famous for his extraordinary passing skills, contagious smile and love of the game. In 1981, he signed a 25-year deal with the Lakers for $25 million, one of the NBA’s first over-the-top contracts.

Johnson, a three-time NBA “Most Valuable Player” and 12-time All-Star team member, didn’t completely hang up his basketball shoes after announcing his retirement in 1991.  He was voted most valuable player of the 1992 NBA All-Star Game and played on the Olympic “Dream Team” (alongside Michael Jordan, Larry Bird and Patrick Ewing) that won gold for the U.S. in Barcelona that summer. He briefly returned to the Lakers for the 1993-94 season as head coach and made a short-lived comeback as a Lakers player in the 1995-96 season.

NBA Hall of Famer, Earvin "Magic" Jo...

Today, Johnson is a prominent spokesman for AIDS awareness and a successful businessman, earning millions from a range of ventures, including movie theaters and restaurants. He serves as an example of how a variety of drug treatments have transformed AIDS from a death sentence into a manageable condition for many people in the U.S. Still, some 25 years after the first AIDS cases were reported, 25 million people worldwide have died of AIDS and another 40 million have been infected with the virus.

Also on This Day

American Revolution
Post office stays in the Franklin family, 1776
Automotive
Art Arfons sets land-speed record, 1965
Civil War
North and South clash at the Battle of Belmont, 1861
Cold War
Gaither Report calls for more U.S. missiles and fallout shelters, 1957
Crime
A family is brutally murdered, 1983
Disaster
Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapses, 1940
General Interest
Canada’s transcontinental railway completed, 1885
Tacoma Bridge collapses, 1940
FDR reelected a record third time, 1944
Two African American firsts in politics, 1989
Hollywood
“King of Cool” Steve McQueen dies, 1980
Literary
French novelist Albert Camus is born, 1913
Music
Singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell is born, 1943
Old West
Jeannette Rankin becomes first U.S. congresswoman, 1916
Presidential
FDR wins unprecedented fourth term, 1944
Sports
Magic Johnson announces he has HIV, 1991
Vietnam War
U.S. intelligence asserts numbers of North Vietnamese in South Vietnam growing, 1964
McNamara shouted down at Harvard speech, 1966
Nixon re-elected president, 1972
World War I
First issue of The New Republic published, 1914
World War II
Soviet master spy is hanged by the Japanese, 1944

This Week in History, Nov 7 – Nov 13

 

Nov 07, 1991
Magic Johnson announces he is HIV positive
Nov 08, 1895
German scientist discovers X-rays
Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht
Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts
Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends
Nov 12, 1954
Ellis Island closes
Nov 13, 1982
Vietnam Veterans Memorial dedicated
Story from HISTORY.COM

On This Date: November 6th

Nov 6, 1962:

U.N. condemns apartheid

On this day in 1962, the United Nations General Assembly adopts a resolution condemning South Africa’s racist apartheid policies and calling on all its members to end economic and military relations with the country.

South African Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu...

In effect from 1948 to 1993, apartheid, which comes from the Afrikaans word for “apartness,” was government-sanctioned racial segregation and political and economic discrimination against South Africa’s non-white majority. Among many injustices, blacks were forced to live in segregated areas and couldn’t enter whites-only neighborhoods unless they had a special pass. Although whites represented only a small fraction of the population, they held the vast majority of the country’s land and wealth.

Following the 1960 massacre of unarmed demonstrators at Sharpeville near Johannesburg, South Africa, in which 69 blacks were killed and over 180 were injured, the international movement to end apartheid gained wide support. However, few Western powers or South Africa’s other main trading partners favored a full economic or military embargo against the country. Nonetheless, opposition to apartheid within the U.N. grew, and in 1973 a U.N. resolution labeled apartheid a “crime against humanity.” In 1974, South Africa was suspended from the General Assembly.

President Bill Clinton with Nelson Mandela, Ju...

After decades of strikes, sanctions and increasingly violent demonstrations, many apartheid laws were repealed by 1990. Finally, in 1991, under President F.W. de Klerk, the South African government repealed all remaining apartheid laws and committed to writing a new constitution. In 1993, a multi-racial, multi-party transitional government was approved and, the next year, South Africa held its first fully free elections. Political activist Nelson Mandela, who spent 27 years in prison along with other anti-apartheid leaders after being convicted of treason, became South Africa’s new president.

In 1996, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), established by the new government, began an investigation into the violence and human rights violations that took place under the apartheid system between 1960 and May 10, 1994 (the day Mandela was sworn in as president). The commission’s objective was not to punish people but to heal South Africa by dealing with its past in an open manner. People who committed crimes were allowed to confess and apply for amnesty. Headed by 1984 Nobel Peace Prize winner Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the TRC listened to testimony from over 20,000 witnesses from all sides of the issue—victims and their families as well as perpetrators of violence. It released its report in 1998 and condemned all major political organizations—the apartheid government in addition to anti-apartheid forces such as the African National Congress—for contributing to the violence. Based on the TRC’s recommendations, the government began making reparation payments of approximately $4,000 (U.S.) to individual victims of violence in 2003.

Also on This Day

American Revolution
John Carroll named first Catholic bishop in U.S., 1789
Automotive
President Clinton designates “Automobile National Heritage Area” in Detroit, 1998
Civil War
Jefferson Davis elected president of the Confederacy, 1861
Cold War
Renowned Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov visits United States, 1988
Crime
A woman ices her husband with anti-freeze, 1982
Disaster
Dam gives way in Georgia, 1977
General Interest
Abraham Lincoln elected president, 1860
Canadians take Passchendaele, 1917
Bolsheviks revolt in Russia, 1917
Hollywood
Downey stars in Less Than Zero, 1987
Literary
Playwright Thomas Kyd is baptized, 1558
Music
John Philip Sousa is born, 1854
Old West
Cabeza de Vaca discovers Texas, 1528
Presidential
Teddy Roosevelt travels to Panama, 1906
Sports
Art Modell announces Browns are moving to Baltimore, 1995
Vietnam War
General Minh takes over leadership of South Vietnam, 1963
South Vietnamese forces attack into Cambodia, 1970
World War I
British victory at Passchendaele , 1917
World War II
Stalin celebrates the Revolution’s anniversary, 1941

This Week in History, Nov 6 – Nov 12

 

Nov 06, 1962
U.N. condemns apartheid
Nov 07, 1991
Magic Johnson announces he is HIV positive
Nov 08, 1895
German scientist discovers X-rays
Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht
Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts
Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends
Nov 12, 1954
Ellis Island closes

On This Date: November 5th

Nov 5, 1994:

George Foreman becomes oldest heavyweight champ

On this day in 1994, George Foreman, age 45, becomes boxing’s oldest heavyweight champion when he defeats 26-year-old Michael Moorer in the 10th round of their WBA fight in Las Vegas. More than 12,000 spectators at the MGM Grand Hotel watched Foreman dethrone Moorer, who went into the fight with a 35-0 record. Foreman dedicated his upset win to “all my buddies in the nursing home and all the guys in jail.”

African American boxer George Foreman

Born in 1949 in Marshal, Texas, Foreman had a troubled childhood and dropped out of high school. Eventually, he joined President Lyndon Johnson‘s Jobs Corps work program and discovered a talent for boxing. “Big George,” as he was nicknamed, took home a gold medal for the U.S. at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. In 1973 in Kingston, Jamaica, after winning his first 37 professional matches, 34 by knockout, Foreman KO’d “Smokin'” Joe Frazier after two rounds and was crowned heavyweight champ. At 1974’s “Rumble in the Jungle” in Kinshasha, Zaire, the younger, stronger Foreman suffered a surprising loss to underdog Muhammad Ali and was forced to relinquish his championship title. Three years later, Big George morphed from pugilist into preacher, when he had a religious experience in his dressing room after losing a fight. He retired from boxing, became an ordained minister in Houston and founded a youth center.

A decade later, the millions he’d made as a boxer gone, Foreman returned to the ring at age 38 and staged a successful comeback. When he won his second heavyweight title in his 1994 fight against Moorer, becoming the WBA and IBF champ, Foreman was wearing the same red trunks he’d had on the night he lost to Ali.

Foreman didn’t hang onto the heavyweight mantle for long. In March 1995, he was stripped of his WBA title after refusing to fight No. 1 contender Tony Tucker, and he gave up his IBF title in June 1995 rather than fight a rematch with Axel Schulz, whom he’d narrowly beat in a controversial judges’ decision in April of that same year. Foreman’s last fight was in 1997; he lost to Shannon Biggs. He retired with a lifetime record of 76-5.

Outside of the boxing ring, Foreman, who has five sons, all named George, and five daughters, has become enormously wealthy as an entrepreneur and genial TV pitchman for a variety of products, including the hugely popular George Foreman Grill.

Also on This Day

Lincoln in McClellan's tent after the Battle o...

 American Revolution

Washington condemns Guy Fawkes festivities, 1775
Automotive
George Selden patents gas-powered car, 1895
Civil War
President Lincoln removes General McClellan, 1862
Cold War
Richard Nixon elected president, 1968
Crime
Army major kills 13 people in Fort Hood shooting spree, 2009
Disaster
Philippines struggles with severe flooding, 1991
General Interest
Mughal victory assures Akbar’s ascension, 1556
King James learns of gunpowder plot, 1605
Wilson wins landslide victory, 1912
An American Nobel Prize in Literature, 1930
Jewish extremist assassinated in New York, 1990
Hollywood
Writers strike stalls production of TV shows, movies, 2007
Literary
Willa Cather starts writing for the Nebraska State Journal, 1893
Music
Samuel Barber’s Adagio For Strings receives its world premiere on NBC radio, 1938
Old West
300 Santee Sioux sentenced to hang in Minnesota, 1862
Presidential
George W. Bush marries Laura Welch in Midland, Texas, 1977
Sports
George Foreman becomes oldest heavyweight champ in history, 1994
Vietnam War
Nixon wins presidential election, 1968
U.S. combat deaths down, 1970
World War I
Battle of Tanga ends in defeat for British colonial troops, 1914
World War II
FDR re-elected president, 1940
This Week in History, Nov 5 – Nov 11

Nov 05, 1994
George Foreman becomes oldest heavyweight champ
Nov 06, 1962
U.N. condemns apartheid
Nov 07, 1991
Magic Johnson announces he is HIV positive
Nov 08, 1895
German scientist discovers X-rays
Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht
Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts
Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends

On This Date- November 4th

Nov 4, 1956:

Soviets put brutal end to Hungarian revolution

A spontaneous national uprising that began 12 days before in Hungary is viciously crushed by Soviet tanks and troops on this day in 1956. Thousands were killed and wounded and nearly a quarter-million Hungarians fled the country.

Nikita Khrushchev, leader of the Union of Sovi...

The problems in Hungary began in October 1956, when thousands of protesters took to the streets demanding a more democratic political system and freedom from Soviet oppression. In response, Communist Party officials appointed Imre Nagy, a former premier who had been dismissed from the party for his criticisms of Stalinist policies, as the new premier.  Nagy tried to restore peace and asked the Soviets to withdraw their troops. The Soviets did so, but Nagy then tried to push the Hungarian revolt forward by abolishing one-party rule. He also announced that Hungary was withdrawing from the Warsaw Pact (the Soviet bloc’s equivalent of NATO).

On November 4, 1956, Soviet tanks rolled into Budapest to crush, once and for all, the national uprising. Vicious street fighting broke out, but the Soviets’ great power ensured victory. At 5:20 a.m., Hungarian Prime Minister Imre Nagy announced the invasion to the nation in a grim, 35-second broadcast, declaring: “Our troops are fighting. The Government is in place.” Within hours, though, Nagy sought asylum at the Yugoslav Embassy in Budapest. He was captured shortly thereafter and executed two years later. Nagy’s former colleague and imminent replacement, János Kádár, who had been flown secretly from Moscow to the city of Szolnok, 60 miles southeast of the capital, prepared to take power with Moscow’s backing.

The Eastern Bloc - after the annexations and i...

The Soviet action stunned many people in the West. Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev had pledged a retreat from the Stalinist policies and repression of the past, but the violent actions in Budapest suggested otherwise. An estimated 2,500 Hungarians died and 200,000 more fled as refugees. Sporadic armed resistance, strikes and mass arrests continued for months thereafter, causing substantial economic disruption.  Inaction on the part of the United States angered and frustrated many Hungarians. Voice of America radio broadcasts and speeches by President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Secretary of State John Foster Dulles had recently suggested that the United States supported the “liberation” of “captive peoples” in communist nations. Yet, as Soviet tanks bore down on the protesters, the United States did nothing beyond issuing public statements of sympathy for their plight.

Coat of arms of Hungary

Coat of arms of Hungary

 
American Revolution
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Automotive
Iranian students storm U.S. embassy in Tehran, leading to oil embargo, 1979
Civil War
Rebels attack Yankee supply base at the Battle of Johnsonville, 1864
Cold War
Soviets crush Hungarian revolt, 1956
Crime
One of New York’s most notorious gamblers is shot to death, 1928
Disaster
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General Interest
Entrance to King Tut’s tomb discovered, 1922
Iranians storm U.S. embassy, 1979
Yitzhak Rabin assassinated, 1995
Hollywood
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Literary
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Music
Anne Murray earns a #1 pop hit with “You Needed Me”, 1978
Old West
Will Rogers is born in Oklahoma, 1879
Presidential
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Sports
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Vietnam War
South Vietnamese battle communists along the Cambodian border, 1969
U.S. hands over air base to the Vietnamese Air Force, 1970
World War I
Poet Wilfred Owen killed in action , 1918
World War II
Gen. Sir John Dill dies, 1944
This Week in History, Nov 4 – Nov 10

Nov 04, 1956
Soviets put brutal end to Hungarian revolution
Nov 05, 1994
George Foreman becomes oldest heavyweight champ
Nov 06, 1962
U.N. condemns apartheid
Nov 07, 1991
Magic Johnson announces he is HIV positive
Nov 08, 1895
German scientist discovers X-rays
Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht
Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts

On This Date- November 3rd

Nov 3, 1964:

D.C. residents cast first presidential votes

On this day in 1964, residents of the District of Columbia cast their ballots in a presidential election for the first time. The passage of the 23rd Amendment in 1961 gave citizens of the nation’s capital the right to vote for a commander in chief and vice president. They went on to help Democrat Lyndon Johnson defeat Republican Barry Goldwater in 1964, the next presidential election.

Taxation without Representation

dbking via Flickr

Between 1776 and 1800, New York and then Philadelphia served as the temporary center of government for the newly formed United States. The capital’s location was a source of much controversy and debate, especially for Southern politicians, who didn’t want it located too far north. In 1790, Congress passed a law allowing President George Washington to choose the permanent site. As a compromise, he selected a tract of undeveloped swampland on the Potomac River, between Maryland and Virginia, and began to refer to it as Federal City. The commissioners overseeing the development of the new city picked its permanent name—Washington—to honor the president. Congress met for the first time in Washington, D.C., on November 17, 1800.

The District was put under the jurisdiction of Congress, which terminated D.C. residents’ voting rights in 1801. In 1961, the 23rd Amendment restored these rights, allowing D.C. voters to choose electors for the Electoral College based on population, with a maximum of as many electors as the least populated state. With a current population of over 550,000 residents, 61-square-mile D.C. has three electoral votes, just like Wyoming, America’s smallest state, population-wise. The majority of D.C.’s residents are African Americans and they have voted overwhelmingly for Democratic candidates in past presidential elections.

Seal of the District of Columbia.

In 1970, Congress gave Washington, D.C., one non-voting delegate to the House of Representatives and with the passage of 1973’s Home Rule Act, Washingtonians got their first elected mayor and city council. In 1978, a proposed amendment would have given D.C. the right to select electors, representatives and senators, just like a state, but it failed to pass, as have subsequent calls for D.C. statehood.

Also on This Day

 
American Revolution
Washington learns of Conway cabal, 1777
Automotive
Detroit-Windsor Tunnel opens to traffic, 1930
Civil War
Confederate General Jubal Early is born, 1816
Cold War
Johnson defeats Goldwater for presidency, 1964
Crime
A serial killer abducts and rapes his teenage victim, 1984
Disaster
Hotel fire ends in disaster in South Korea, 1974
General Interest
Panama declares independence, 1903
The Soviet space dog, 1957
Communists and Klansmen clash in Greensboro, 1979
Iran arms sales revealed, 1986
Hollywood
Carrie creeps out audiences, 1976
Literary
Thackeray completes Barry Lyndon, 1844
Music
The Crystals earn a #1 hit with “He’s A Rebel”—or do they?, 1962
Old West
Black Bart makes his last stagecoach robbery, 1883
Presidential
Newspaper mistakenly declares Dewey president, 1948
Sports
The Body is elected governor of Minnesota, 1998
Vietnam War
Battle of Dak To begins, 1967
Nixon calls on the “silent majority”, 1969
World War I
Central Powers face rebellion on the home front, 1918
World War II
The order is given: Bomb Pearl Harbor, 1941
This Week in History, Nov 3 – Nov 9

Nov 03, 1964
D.C. residents cast first presidential votes
Nov 04, 1956
Soviets put brutal end to Hungarian revolution
Nov 05, 1994
George Foreman becomes oldest heavyweight champ
Nov 06, 1962
U.N. condemns apartheid
Nov 07, 1991
Magic Johnson announces he is HIV positive
Nov 08, 1895
German scientist discovers X-rays
Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht

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