Final Curtain Call- We’ll Miss Ya Smokin’ Joe

Joe Frazier, Champion and Competitor

Joe Frazier, Former Heavyweight Boxing Champ, Dies at 67

Joe Frazier, the former heavyweight boxing champ who died of liver cancer on Nov. 7 at 67, won’t go down in history as the greatest fighter of all time. Muhammad Ali, the man with whom Frazier sparred so epically, both inside and outside the ropes, owns that distinction. Frazier’s role in his rival’s outsize life will always define his own legacy: it’s impossible to mention “Smokin’ Joe” without summoning Ali a few seconds later.

Joe Frazier, pictured at his Philadelphia boxing gym in 2009,
died of liver cancer on Nov. 7, 2011, at 67 – Al Bello / Images

But if Ali defined Frazier, well, Frazier made Ali too. If not for Frazier’s greatness — his left hook crumbled opponents, and he defended his heavyweight title four times from 1970 to ’73 — Ali could never have been called the Greatest. And though the annals of boxing won’t remember
him as the better fighter, at times Frazier could be the bigger man.(See photos of Frazier’s life.)

Ali feared Frazier, and that insecurity brought out the worst in him. During
the height of their rivalry in the racially charged post–civil rights 1970s, Ali
belittled Frazier whenever he could. He’d call Frazier an “Uncle Tom,”
“ignorant,” “the Gorilla.” In black communities, Ali characterized Frazier as the white man’s champ. “I’m not just fightin’ one man,” Ali bellowed before their first bout, in 1971, the “Fight of the Century” at New York City’s Madison Square Garden. “I’m fightin’ a lot of men, showin’ a lot of ’em here is one man they couldn’t conquer. My mission is to bring freedom to 30 million black people. I’ll win this fight because I’ve got a cause. Frazier has no cause. He’s in it for the money alone.” (Frazier won the bout in a 15-round decision.)

Joe Frazier
Bettmann / Corbis

Frazier, who was inelegant, introspective and prone to mood swings that he called the slouchies, rarely rose to Ali’s bait. “I don’t want to be no more than no more than what I am,” he once said. Friends wondered
whether Frazier paid any mind to the social injustices that Ali harped on. Ali relished his role as cultural provocateur; his preaching, as much as his
pugilism, is why he is revered. Still, Ali never had reason to use Frazier as a comic foil, especially since the shots he took were far from funny. “Ali can’t touch me,” Frazier said, “in ability or decency.” (See Muhammad Ali photos by Magnum photographers.)

Joe Frazier grew up in Beaufort, S.C., where he was raised in a four-room shack on a farm, the second youngest of 13 children. He threw his first punches against a feed bag stuffed with rags, hung from an oak tree. Frazier told his siblings he’d be the next Joe Louis. “I’d hit that heavy bag for an hour at a time,” he once said. “I’d wrap my hands with a necktie of my Daddy’s, or a stocking of my Momma’s or sister’s, and get to it.” At school, kids would give him a quarter or a sandwich to walk with them as a repellent against bullies.

Ali portrayed Frazier as some sort of puppet of the white man, but in truth, Jim Crow sent Frazier fleeing from South Carolina. “Son,” Frazier’s mother told him, “if y’all can’t get along with the white man in the South, y’all better leave home.” A teenage Frazier hitchhiked to Charleston and, as he said, “caught the first thing smokin’ that was goin’ north.” Frazier settled in Philadelphia, where he took a job as a butcher in a kosher slaughterhouse. He caught the eye of a fight manager at a local Police
Athletic League, and lost only one of his amateur fights, to Buster Mathis at the trials for the 1964 Olympics. Mathis got hurt, however, and the trip to the Tokyo Games fell to Frazier. Despite fighting his final match with a broken thumb, Frazier came home with the heavyweight gold. (See the top 10 boxing matches of all-time.)

Joe Frazier
Chris Weeks / WireImage / Getty Images

The medal didn’t make Frazier rich: after Tokyo, he took a job as a janitor
in a North Philadelphia Baptist church. But he soon found some financial backing and turned pro in 1965. With Ali stripped of his boxing license because of his refusal to serve in Vietnam, Frazier soared through the heavyweight ranks and won the world title in 1970. But that same year, Ali returned to the ring; their first face-off — the Fight of the Century — came on March 8, 1971.

TIME wrote before the fight: “No amount of bluster is likely to deter Smokin’ Joe, a raging, bobbing, weaving, rolling swarmer who moves in one basic direction-right at his opponent’s gut. A kind of motorized
Marciano, he works his short arms like pistons, pumping away with such
mechanical precision that he consistently throws between 54 and 58 punches each round. He works almost exclusively inside, crouching and always moving in to slam the body. When the pummeling begins to slow his opponent, when the guard drops to protect the stomach, Frazier tosses a murderous left hook to the head. His coup de grâce is lethal. ‘Getting hit by Joe,’ says Light Heavyweight Ray Anderson, one of Frazier’s sparring partners, ‘is like getting run over by a bus.’ Some of his victims, like Light Heavyweight Champion Bob Foster, literally have no recollection of what hit them.” (See TIME’s “Thrilla in Manila” coverage.)

In typically understated fashion, Ali labeled the fight “the biggest sporting
event in the history of the whole planet earth.” It was the first time two
undefeated heavyweight champs had met for the title. Ed Sullivan, Alan Shepard, Bill Cosby, Michael Caine, Hubert Humphrey and Burt Bacharach were among the luminaries at ringside. Frank Sinatra took pictures for LIFE magazine. The fight lived up to the billing. Frazier, the body puncher, came out swinging for Ali’s head. Ali, the ring dancer, tried matching Frazier hook-for-hook. Ali turned up the showmanship: he invited Frazier to swing at his gut, and when Frazier connected, he’d shake his head, as if a little kid were punching him. “Nooo contest,” Ali crowed at one point.

Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, Philadelphia, PA...

by cliff1066™ via Flickr

In the 11th round, however, Frazier pummeled Ali with two left hooks. Ali
staggered and barely survived the round. In the 15th and final stanza, Frazier landed one more roundhouse left, sending Ali to the canvas. He got back up, but by that point it was finished: Frazier won the fight on a unanimous decision.

Joe Frazier
Al Bello / Getty Images

It was the only time he beat Ali. Frazier lost his championship belt to
George Foreman, who knocked Frazier down six times before the ref stopped their 1973 title fight in the second round (“Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier!” Howard Cosell memorably cried.) The next year, Ali got his rematch with Frazier, and won it in a decision to set up their rubber match, in Manila, on Oct. 1, 1975. The “Thrilla in Manila” took place in 100°F heat before an estimated 700 million closed-circuit and television viewers in some 65 countries. It became the duo’s most famous brawl. Frazier refused to wear down,
but by the 14th round, Ali was pounding him at will. Frazier’s eyes were almost swollen shut. Frazier’s trainer, Eddie Futch, threw in the towel at the end of the round. “I want him, boss,” Frazier screamed. Futch refused. “It’s all over,” Futch replied. “No one will forget what you did here today.” He was right. Afterward, Ali said he had never felt closer to death. He described Frazier as “the greatest fighter of all time, next to me.”

Frazier lost to Foreman one more time, in 1976, and attempted an early 1980s comeback, thankfully short-lived. He started a musical act, Smokin’ Joe and the Knockouts; that didn’t last long either. He opened up a gym in North Philadelphia, and like too many ex-fighters he fell on hard times. “Over the years, Frazier has lost a fortune through a combination of his own generosity and naïveté,” read a 2006 profile in the New York Times, “his carousing, failed business opportunities and deep hatred for his former chief boxing rival, Muhammad Ali.”

NYC: Madison Square Garden

by wallyg via Flickr

After their fighting days, Frazier matched Ali’s past unseemliness with some hurtful remarks of his own. “Look at him now,” Frazier told writer Thomas Hauser for his 1992 book on Ali. “He’s damaged goods. I know it; you know it. Everyone knows it … He was always making fun of me. I’m the dummy; I’m the one getting hit in the head. Tell me now, him or me: Which one talks worse now?” In 1996, after Ali lit the Olympic torch at the Atlanta Games, Frazier told a group of reporters, “I wish Ali had fallen into [the flame]. If I had the chance, I’d have pushed him in.” Such comments did not endear Frazier to any corporate sponsors.

But in recent years, Frazier’s bitterness faded. “Nobody has anything but
good things to say about Muhammad now,” Frazier told SI.com in 2009. “I’d do anything he needed for me to help.” A few years ago, the pair conducted a photo shoot together at Frazier’s gym, which is now shuttered. The day before Frazier’s death, Ali said in a statement: “My family and I are keeping Joe and his family in our daily prayers. Joe has a lot of friends pulling for him, and I’m one of them.”

Frazier lost this last fight. But in so many others, he thrilled the
world.

See TIME’s Ali and Frazier cover.
Read how Frazier was diagnosed with cancer.

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Norman Ramsey Dies- Worked On Atomic Clock

Norman Ramsey Dies at 96; Work Led to the Atomic Clock

By JASCHA HOFFMAN

Norman F. Ramsey, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist who developed a precise method to probe the structure of atoms and molecules and used it to devise a remarkably exact way to keep time, died on Friday in Wayland, Mass. He was 96.

His death was confirmed by his wife, Ellie.

In 1949, Dr. Ramsey invented an experimental technique to measure the frequencies of electromagnetic radiation most readily absorbed by atoms and molecules. The technique allowed scientists to investigate their structure with greater accuracy and enabled the development of a new kind of timekeeping device known as the atomic clock. Dr. Ramsey received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1989 for both achievements.

“If you made a list of the most outstanding physicists of the 20th century, he’d be among the leaders,” said Leon M. Lederman, emeritus director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill., which Dr. Ramsey helped found.

Associated Press   Norman F. Ramsey in 1989.
 Early in the 20th century, physicists began to decipher the structure of atoms from measurements of the wavelengths of light they released and absorbed, a method called atomic spectroscopy. In 1937, the physicist Isidor Isaac Rabiof Columbia University developed a means of studying atoms and molecules by sending a stream of them through rapidly alternating magnetic fields. As Dr. Rabi’s student at Columbia in the late 1930s, Dr. Ramsey worked to refine it.

In 1949, when he was at Harvard, Dr. Ramsey discovered a way to improve the technique’s accuracy: exposing the atoms and molecules to the magnetic fields only briefly as they entered and left the apparatus. His new approach — which Dr. Ramsey called the separated oscillatory fields method, but which is often simply referred to as the Ramsey method — is widely used today.

Dr. Ramsey’s research helped lay the groundwork for nuclear magnetic resonance, whose applications include the M.R.I. technique now widely used for medical diagnosis.

But the most immediate application of the Ramsey method has been in the development of highly accurate atomic clocks. Since 1967 it has been used to define the exact span of a second, not as a fraction of the time it takes Earth to revolve around the Sun, but as 9,192,631,770 radiation cycles of a cesium atom.

In 1960, working with his student Daniel Kleppner, now an emeritus professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Ramsey invented a different type of atomic clock, known as the hydrogen maser, whose remarkable stability has since been used to confirm the minute effects of gravity on time as predicted by Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Atomic clocks like the hydrogen maser are also used in the ground-based timing systems that track global positioning satellites.

National Archives and Records Administration

Dr. Ramsey signing the atomic bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945.

Dr. Ramsey did not anticipate that his laboratory technique would have such applications. “I didn’t even know there was a problem about clocks initially,” he said in a 1995 oral history interview. “My wristwatch was pretty good.”

Norman Foster Ramsey Jr. was born on Aug. 27, 1915, in Washington, the son of Minna Bauer Ramsey, a mathematics teacher, and Norman Foster Ramsey, an Army officer. After receiving his Ph.D. under Dr. Rabi at Columbia, he worked at the M.I.T. Radiation Laboratory and served as a radar consultant to the secretary of war. In 1943 he went to Los Alamos, N.M., to work on the Manhattan Project, leading a team that helped assemble the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.

After the war, he taught for nearly four decades at Harvard, mentoring scores of graduate students, many of whom went on to start their own research groups. Although he officially retired in 1986, he continued his work through his early 90s. In recent years, he collaborated with a team of British physicists to study the symmetry of the neutron, searching for evidence that it was not perfectly spherical.

Chip-scale atomic clock unveiled by NIST

Dr. Ramsey presided over the founding of Fermilab and another major particle accelerator laboratory, the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, where he was the first head of the physics department in the 1940s.

As the first science adviser to NATO, he initiated summer school programs to train European scientists. He led a National Research Council committee that concluded in 1982 that contrary to the findings of the House Select Committee on Assassinations, acoustical evidence did not support the existence of a second gunman in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Dr. Ramsey had an athletic flair. He learned to ski in Norway in the 1930s. Later, he took up long-board surfing and ice sailing, and he traveled with his second wife, Ellie Welch Ramsey, from the Himalayas to Antarctica. After having a knee replaced in the 1980s, he continued to ski.

Dr. Ramsey’s first wife, Elinor, died in 1983. In addition to his wife, he is survived by four daughters, Margaret Kasschau, Patricia Ramsey, Winifred Swarr and Janet Farrell; two stepchildren, Marguerite and Gerard Welch; eight grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

Colleagues said Dr. Ramsey was a tall man with bright white hair who gestured energetically and walked briskly. “He had a messianic quality when talking about his work,” said Gerald Gabrielse, a physics professor at Harvard.

William Phillips, a physicist at the University of Maryland, said Dr. Ramsey’s forceful presence and as his contributions “set the tone for a generation of physicists.”

Just A Regular Guy- We Will Miss You Andy

Former ‘60 Minutes‘ commentator Andy Rooney dies

APBy DAVID BAUDER – AP Television Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Andy Rooney so dreaded the day he had to end his signature “60 Minutes” commentaries about life’s large and small absurdities that he kept going until he was 92 years old.

Even then, he said he wasn’t retiring. Writers never retire. But his life after the end of “A Few Minutes With Andy Rooney” was short: He died Friday night, according to CBS, only a month after delivering his 1,097th and final televised commentary.

Andy Rooney, photographed by Stephenson Brown.

Rooney had gone to the hospital for an undisclosed surgery, but major complications developed and he never recovered.

“Andy always said he wanted to work until the day he died, and he managed to do it, save the last few weeks in the hospital,” said his “60 Minutes” colleague, correspondent Steve Kroft.

Rooney talked on “60 Minutes” about what was in the news, and his opinions occasionally got him in trouble. But he was just as likely to discuss the old clothes in his closet, why air travel had become
unpleasant and why banks needed to have important-sounding names.

Rooney won one of his four Emmy Awards for a piece on whether there was a real Mrs. Smith who made Mrs. Smith’s Pies. As it turned out, there was no Mrs. Smith.

“I obviously have a knack for getting on paper what a lot of people have thought and didn’t realize they thought,” Rooney once said. “And they say, ‘Hey, yeah!’ And they like that.”

Looking for something new to punctuate its weekly broadcast, “60 Minutes” aired its first Rooney commentary on July 2, 1978. He complained about people who keep track of how many people die in car accidents on holiday weekends. In fact, he said, the Fourth of July is “one of the safest weekends of the year to be going someplace.”

60 Minutes (Australian TV program)

More than three decades later, he was railing about how unpleasant air travel had become. “Let’s make a statement to the airlines just to get their
attention,” he said. “We’ll pick a week next year and we’ll all agree not to go anywhere for seven days.”

In early 2009, as he was about to turn 90, Rooney looked ahead to President Barack Obama’s upcoming inauguration with a look at past inaugurations. He told viewers that Calvin Coolidge’s 1925 swearing-in was the first to be broadcast on radio, adding, “That may have been the most interesting thing Coolidge ever did.”

“Words cannot adequately express Andy’s contribution to the world of
journalism and the impact he made — as a colleague and a friend — upon everybody at CBS,” said Leslie Moonves, CBS Corp. president and CEO.

Jeff Fager, CBS News chairman and “60 Minutes” executive producer, said “it’s hard to imagine not having Andy around. He loved his life and he lived it on his own terms. We will miss him very much.”

For his final essay, Rooney said that he’d live a life luckier than most.

“I wish I could do this forever. I can’t, though,” he said.

He said he probably hadn’t said anything on “60 Minutes” that most of his
viewers didn’t already know or hadn’t thought. “That’s what a writer does,” he said. “A writer’s job is to tell the truth.”

FILE - In this August 1978 file photo, CBS News producer and correspondent Andrew Rooney poses for photos in his New York office. CBS says former "60 Minutes" commentator Andy Rooney died at age 92. (

AP Photo/Carlos Rene Perez

True to his occasional crotchety nature, though, he complained about being famous or bothered by fans. His last wish from fans: If you see him in a restaurant, just let him eat his dinner.

Rooney was a freelance writer in 1949 when he encountered CBS radio star Arthur Godfrey in an elevator and — with the bluntness millions of people learned about later — told him his show could use better writing. Godfrey hired him and by 1953, when he moved to TV, Rooney was his only writer.

He wrote for CBS’ Garry Moore during the early 1960s before settling into a partnership with Harry Reasoner at CBS News. Given a challenge to write on any topic, he wrote “An Essay on Doors” in 1964, and continued with contemplations on bridges, chairs and women.

“The best work I ever did,” Rooney said. “But nobody knows I can do it or
ever did it. Nobody knows that I’m a writer and producer. They think I’m this guy on television.”

He became such a part of the culture that comic Joe Piscopo satirized
Rooney’s squeaky voice with the refrain, “Did you ever wonder …” Rooney never started any of his essays that way. For many years, “60 Minutes” improbably was the most popular program on television and a dose of Rooney was what people came to expect for a knowing smile on the night before they had to go back to work.

CORRECTS DAY AND DATE OF DEATH - FILE - This Sept. 20, 2005 file photo shows "60 Minutes" commentator Andy Rooney in New York. CBS says former "60 Minutes" commentator Andy Rooney died Friday Nov. 4,

Rooney left CBS in 1970 when it refused to air his angry essay about the
Vietnam War. He went on TV for the first time, reading the essay on PBS and winning a Writers Guild of America award for it.

He returned to CBS three years later as a writer and producer of specials.
Notable among them was the 1975 “Mr. Rooney Goes to Washington,” whose lighthearted but serious look at government won him a Peabody Award for excellence in broadcasting.

His words sometimes landed Rooney in hot water. CBS suspended him for three months in 1990 for making racist remarks in an interview, which he denied. Rooney, who was arrested in Florida while in the Army in the 1940s for refusing to leave a seat among blacks on a bus, was hurt deeply by the charge of racism.

Gay rights groups were mad, during the AIDS epidemic, when Rooney mentioned homosexual unions in saying “many of the ills which kill us are self-induced.” Indians protested when Rooney suggested Native Americans who made money from casinos weren’t doing enough to help their own people.

The Associated Press learned the danger of getting on Rooney’s cranky side. In 1996, AP Television Writer Frazier Moore wrote a column suggesting it was time for Rooney to retire. On Rooney’s next “60 Minutes” appearance, he invited those who disagreed to make their opinions known. The AP switchboard was flooded by some 7,000 phone calls and countless postcards were sent to the AP mail room.

“Your piece made me mad,” Rooney told Moore two years later. “One of my major shortcomings — I’m vindictive. I don’t know why that is. Even in petty things in my life I tend to strike back. It’s a lot more pleasurable a sensation than feeling threatened.”He was one of television’s few voices to strongly oppose the war in Iraq after the George W. Bush administration launched it in 2002. After the fall of Baghdad in April 2003, he said he was chastened by its quick fall but didn’t regret his “60 Minutes” commentaries.

“I’m in a position of feeling secure enough so that I can say what I think is
right and if so many people think it’s wrong that I get fired, well, I’ve got
enough to eat,” Rooney said at the time.

Andrew Aitken Rooney was born on Jan. 14, 1919, in Albany, N.Y., and worked as a copy boy on the Albany Knickerbocker News while in high school. College at Colgate University was cut short by World War II, when Rooney worked for Stars and Stripes.

With another former Stars and Stripes staffer, Oram C. Hutton, Rooney wrote four books about the war. They included the 1947 book, “Their Conqueror’s Peace: A Report to the American Stockholders,”
documenting offenses against the Germans by occupying forces.

Rooney and his wife, Marguerite, were married for 62 years before she died of heart failure in 2004. They had four children and lived in New York, with homes in Rowayton, Conn., and upstate New York.
Daughter Emily Rooney is a former executive producer of ABC’s “World News Tonight.” Brian was a longtime ABC News correspondent, Ellen a photographer and Martha Fishel is chief of the public service division of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Services will be private, and it’s anticipated CBS News will hold a public memorial later, Brian Rooney said Saturday.

Humankind Won’t Be Happy Until We All Are Extinct

Bloggo Schloggo Sponsors The World Wildlife Fund on this blog. Click on the WWF box ( social vibe widget in the sidebar of home page-
 https://chuckoliver.wordpress.com/ )
to give your support to this organization which is needed now more than ever as this sad tale exemplifies…

Vietnam Rhino Is Now Extinct, Officials Report

LiveScience.comLiveScience.com

A rhinoceros killed for its horn last year in Vietnam is now considered to have been the last of its subspecies.

Panzernashorn (Rhinoceros unicornis) mit Junge...

Scientists from the World Wildlife Fund reported Monday (Oct. 25) that they and their partners have analyzed the DNA from 22 dung samples
collected in Vietnam since April 2010, when the animal was killed, and found that they all belonged to that single rhino, confirming this type of wild Javan rhino is now extinct.

The rhinoceros was found dead in Cat Tien National Park in April 2010 with a bullet in its leg and its horn removed.

Rhino horn

Loss of habitat, combined with poaching for the animals’ horns, has driven many Asian rhino species to the brink of extinction, the WWF says. The rhino horn is used in China and Vietnam to treat typhoid fever,
convulsions and other disorders after it is ground into a powder and dissolved in boiling water. An upsurge in demand for it in Vietnam has been linked to a rumor that it can also cure cancer, the researchers said.

Javan Rhino "Auch ein Anstand", from...

However, according to the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, there is no scientific evidence that rhino horn has any
medicinal value, the researchers noted.

Endangered rhinos

The Javan rhino, or lesser one-horned rhinoceros, looks similar to the closely related greater one-horned rhinoceros, but it has a much smaller head, a slightly smaller overall size, and looser, less-apparent skin folds, according to the WWF.

The remaining Javan rhino population is confined to fewer than 50 in Ujung Kulon National Park on the Indonesian island of Java, the researchers say. This subspecies of Javan rhino is called Rhinoceros sondaicus sondaicus, while the Vietnamese Javan rhinoceros was referred to as Rhinoceros sondaicus annamiticus.

Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus sondaicus) s...

“For the Javan rhino, we now have to focus entirely on one site in Indonesia, where strengthened protection is needed along with fast-tracking the proposed translocation and habitat management,” said
Barney Long, the WWF’s Asian species expert.

The WWF and its partners plan to evaluate the possibility of translocating rhinos from Ujung Kulon National Park to establish a new population in other habitat over the next few years.

Support The World Wildlife Fund
http://worldwildlife.org/

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When A Great Mind Leaves We Are Left With Dumb & Dumber

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs was a college dropout when he teamed up with Steve Wozniak in 1976 to sell personal computers assembled in  Jobs’ garage. That was the beginning of Apple Computers, which revolutionized  the computing industry and made Steve Jobs a multimillionaire before he was 30  years old. He was forced out of the company in 1985 and started the NeXT  Corporation, but returned to his old company in 1996 when Apple bought NeXT.  Steve Jobs soon became Apple’s chief executive officer and sparked a resurgence  in the company with products like the colorful iMac computer and the iPod music  player. Steve Jobs was also the CEO of Pixar, the animation company responsible  for movies like Toy Story and Monsters, Inc. Pixar was purchased  by the Walt Disney Company in 2006 for $7.4  billion in stock; the deal made Jobs the largest individual shareholder of  Disney stock. Jobs was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2003 and had surgery  in July of 2004, and was criticized by some for not disclosing his illness to  stockholders until after the fact. His health was in the news again in 2008,  when his extreme weight loss sparked rumors that his cancer had recurred. Jobs  refused to speak publicly about his health, but in January of 2009 he took a  formal six-month leave of absence from Apple, saying that his health problems  were “more complex than I originally thought.” He had a liver transplant later  that year and returned to work at Apple in June of 2009. In January of 2011 he  again announced, without offering details, that he was taking a medical leave of  absence. He resigned as Apple CEO on 24 August 2011, saying “I have always said  if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations  as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day  has come.” He remained with the company as Chairman of the Board until he died  about five weeks later.

Some sources list Los Altos, California as Steve Jobs’s place of birth.  However, in a 1995 oral history interview with The Smithsonian, Jobs said, “I  was born in San Francisco, California, USA, planet Earth, February 24, 1955.”  Jobs was given up for adoption after birth and raised by his adoptive parents in  Silicon Valley… His biological sister is novelist Mona Simpson, the author of Anywhere But Here… Jobs attended Reed College in Portland, Oregon for  one semester in 1972 before dropping out… He married the former Laurene Powell  on 18 March 1991. They have three children: Eve, Erin, and Reed. Jobs also has a  daughter, Lisa Brennan-Jobs, born in 1978 to Jobs and his then-girlfriend  Chrisann Brennan.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/steve-jobs#ixzz1a3bb1zxk