Image Of The Day- “Impulsive Attraction”

Image

“Impulsive Attraction”
by Charles Oliver

impulsiveattraction

"Impulsive Attraction" by Charles Oliver

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For more art by the artist visit…
Charles Oliver Art – Contemporary Art
The Shenandoah Collection – Traditional Fine Art

Circumcision bamboo sticks and got the interviews

Journalist Undergoes Bamboo-Stick Circumcision For Scoop

Wins award for “Best Scoop” on Papua New Guinea rebels

By Sara Dover

A dedicated journalist travelled through jungles, crossed rivers and got circumsized by bamboo sticks to get a scoop.

Simon Eroro of the Papua New Guinea Post-Courier was given the “Best Scoop” award by his employers at News International, Rupert Murdoch’s NewsCorp Australian Branch, for going above and beyond on an article about the movements of militants in Papua New Guinea, The Australian reports.

Journalist Undergoes Bamboo-Stick Circumcision For Scoop

NBCPhiladelphia.com

Journalists are rarely granted access by Free West Papua rebels into their region. But the rebels, who are fighting for independence in Papua and West Papua from Indonesia, agreed to let Eroro in if he underwent a “cleansing.” He agreed to a circumsision with bamboo sticks and got the interviews.

He later wrote a story on the cross-border movements of the Free West Papua militants from Indonesia into Papua New Guinea, leading the police commissioner to tighten security along the border and close militant refugee camps, according to The Telegraph.

At an award ceremony Friday in Sydney attended by Murdoch, Eroro thanked his wife and eidtor for “trusting me and engaging me on that assignments.

Murdoch praised Eroro’s dedication, saying “Tonight, I have witness many examples of great journalism. it is the backbone of what makes News Limited a great company.”

News Photos Of The Day- Dressing Collected Corpses As Dolls

Editor’s note: This post contains graphic images of dead bodies.

“Cemetery collector” with 29 bodies arrested

MOSCOWRussian police have arrested a man described by local media as the “cemetery collector” for digging up 29 corpses and dressing the remains in female clothing to display around his flat.   

Grainy police video images of the man’s cramped flat showed what look like several life-sized female dolls without faces, some with platinum blond wigs.

“During a search of his flat and garage, 29 self-made, life-size dolls dressed in the clothes of buried people were found,” a spokesman for police in Nizhny Novgorod, 400 km (250 miles) east of Moscow, said Tuesday.

“It was ascertained that he used mummified human bodies from graves to make them (the dolls).”

Police described the man, who was arrested following the desecration of graves in the area, as a local historian and an expert in the study of place names.

Media cited friends as saying they had never seen the dolls and that he was a learned, if eccentric, man.

Copyright 2011 Thomson Reuters.

AP

This undated video image provided by the Russian Interior Ministry’s branch in the Nizhny Novgorod region on Monday, Nov. 7, shows a suspect accused of vandalizing graves in the region of Nizhny Novgorod, some 400 kilometers (250 miles) east of Moscow. Police didn’t name the suspect, who  kept 29 mummified bodies at his apartment and dressed them up like dolls, but Russian media reports identified him as Anatoly Moskvin, a local historian.

Reuters

A still image taken from undated police footage shot inside the flat of Anatoly Moskvin and released to Reuters on November 8 shows books, clothes and dressed figures, reportedly mummified bodies desecrated from cemeteries. Russian police have arrested a man described by local media as the “cemetery collector” for digging up 29 corpses and dressing the remains in female clothing to display around his flat. Police discovered dolls and corpses dressed as dolls during the search.

Reuters

A still image taken from undated police footage shot inside the flat of Anatoly Moskvin and released to Reuters on November 8 shows books, clothes and dressed figures, reportedly mummified bodies desecrated from cemeteries.

Reuters

A still image taken from undated police footage shot inside the flat of Anatoly Moskvin and released to Reuters on November 8 shows books, clothes and dressed figures, reportedly mummified bodies desecrated from cemeteries.

Final Curtain Call- We’ll Miss Ya Smokin’ Joe

Joe Frazier, Champion and Competitor

Joe Frazier, Former Heavyweight Boxing Champ, Dies at 67

Joe Frazier, the former heavyweight boxing champ who died of liver cancer on Nov. 7 at 67, won’t go down in history as the greatest fighter of all time. Muhammad Ali, the man with whom Frazier sparred so epically, both inside and outside the ropes, owns that distinction. Frazier’s role in his rival’s outsize life will always define his own legacy: it’s impossible to mention “Smokin’ Joe” without summoning Ali a few seconds later.

Joe Frazier, pictured at his Philadelphia boxing gym in 2009,
died of liver cancer on Nov. 7, 2011, at 67 – Al Bello / Images

But if Ali defined Frazier, well, Frazier made Ali too. If not for Frazier’s greatness — his left hook crumbled opponents, and he defended his heavyweight title four times from 1970 to ’73 — Ali could never have been called the Greatest. And though the annals of boxing won’t remember
him as the better fighter, at times Frazier could be the bigger man.(See photos of Frazier’s life.)

Ali feared Frazier, and that insecurity brought out the worst in him. During
the height of their rivalry in the racially charged post–civil rights 1970s, Ali
belittled Frazier whenever he could. He’d call Frazier an “Uncle Tom,”
“ignorant,” “the Gorilla.” In black communities, Ali characterized Frazier as the white man’s champ. “I’m not just fightin’ one man,” Ali bellowed before their first bout, in 1971, the “Fight of the Century” at New York City’s Madison Square Garden. “I’m fightin’ a lot of men, showin’ a lot of ’em here is one man they couldn’t conquer. My mission is to bring freedom to 30 million black people. I’ll win this fight because I’ve got a cause. Frazier has no cause. He’s in it for the money alone.” (Frazier won the bout in a 15-round decision.)

Joe Frazier
Bettmann / Corbis

Frazier, who was inelegant, introspective and prone to mood swings that he called the slouchies, rarely rose to Ali’s bait. “I don’t want to be no more than no more than what I am,” he once said. Friends wondered
whether Frazier paid any mind to the social injustices that Ali harped on. Ali relished his role as cultural provocateur; his preaching, as much as his
pugilism, is why he is revered. Still, Ali never had reason to use Frazier as a comic foil, especially since the shots he took were far from funny. “Ali can’t touch me,” Frazier said, “in ability or decency.” (See Muhammad Ali photos by Magnum photographers.)

Joe Frazier grew up in Beaufort, S.C., where he was raised in a four-room shack on a farm, the second youngest of 13 children. He threw his first punches against a feed bag stuffed with rags, hung from an oak tree. Frazier told his siblings he’d be the next Joe Louis. “I’d hit that heavy bag for an hour at a time,” he once said. “I’d wrap my hands with a necktie of my Daddy’s, or a stocking of my Momma’s or sister’s, and get to it.” At school, kids would give him a quarter or a sandwich to walk with them as a repellent against bullies.

Ali portrayed Frazier as some sort of puppet of the white man, but in truth, Jim Crow sent Frazier fleeing from South Carolina. “Son,” Frazier’s mother told him, “if y’all can’t get along with the white man in the South, y’all better leave home.” A teenage Frazier hitchhiked to Charleston and, as he said, “caught the first thing smokin’ that was goin’ north.” Frazier settled in Philadelphia, where he took a job as a butcher in a kosher slaughterhouse. He caught the eye of a fight manager at a local Police
Athletic League, and lost only one of his amateur fights, to Buster Mathis at the trials for the 1964 Olympics. Mathis got hurt, however, and the trip to the Tokyo Games fell to Frazier. Despite fighting his final match with a broken thumb, Frazier came home with the heavyweight gold. (See the top 10 boxing matches of all-time.)

Joe Frazier
Chris Weeks / WireImage / Getty Images

The medal didn’t make Frazier rich: after Tokyo, he took a job as a janitor
in a North Philadelphia Baptist church. But he soon found some financial backing and turned pro in 1965. With Ali stripped of his boxing license because of his refusal to serve in Vietnam, Frazier soared through the heavyweight ranks and won the world title in 1970. But that same year, Ali returned to the ring; their first face-off — the Fight of the Century — came on March 8, 1971.

TIME wrote before the fight: “No amount of bluster is likely to deter Smokin’ Joe, a raging, bobbing, weaving, rolling swarmer who moves in one basic direction-right at his opponent’s gut. A kind of motorized
Marciano, he works his short arms like pistons, pumping away with such
mechanical precision that he consistently throws between 54 and 58 punches each round. He works almost exclusively inside, crouching and always moving in to slam the body. When the pummeling begins to slow his opponent, when the guard drops to protect the stomach, Frazier tosses a murderous left hook to the head. His coup de grâce is lethal. ‘Getting hit by Joe,’ says Light Heavyweight Ray Anderson, one of Frazier’s sparring partners, ‘is like getting run over by a bus.’ Some of his victims, like Light Heavyweight Champion Bob Foster, literally have no recollection of what hit them.” (See TIME’s “Thrilla in Manila” coverage.)

In typically understated fashion, Ali labeled the fight “the biggest sporting
event in the history of the whole planet earth.” It was the first time two
undefeated heavyweight champs had met for the title. Ed Sullivan, Alan Shepard, Bill Cosby, Michael Caine, Hubert Humphrey and Burt Bacharach were among the luminaries at ringside. Frank Sinatra took pictures for LIFE magazine. The fight lived up to the billing. Frazier, the body puncher, came out swinging for Ali’s head. Ali, the ring dancer, tried matching Frazier hook-for-hook. Ali turned up the showmanship: he invited Frazier to swing at his gut, and when Frazier connected, he’d shake his head, as if a little kid were punching him. “Nooo contest,” Ali crowed at one point.

Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, Philadelphia, PA...

by cliff1066™ via Flickr

In the 11th round, however, Frazier pummeled Ali with two left hooks. Ali
staggered and barely survived the round. In the 15th and final stanza, Frazier landed one more roundhouse left, sending Ali to the canvas. He got back up, but by that point it was finished: Frazier won the fight on a unanimous decision.

Joe Frazier
Al Bello / Getty Images

It was the only time he beat Ali. Frazier lost his championship belt to
George Foreman, who knocked Frazier down six times before the ref stopped their 1973 title fight in the second round (“Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier!” Howard Cosell memorably cried.) The next year, Ali got his rematch with Frazier, and won it in a decision to set up their rubber match, in Manila, on Oct. 1, 1975. The “Thrilla in Manila” took place in 100°F heat before an estimated 700 million closed-circuit and television viewers in some 65 countries. It became the duo’s most famous brawl. Frazier refused to wear down,
but by the 14th round, Ali was pounding him at will. Frazier’s eyes were almost swollen shut. Frazier’s trainer, Eddie Futch, threw in the towel at the end of the round. “I want him, boss,” Frazier screamed. Futch refused. “It’s all over,” Futch replied. “No one will forget what you did here today.” He was right. Afterward, Ali said he had never felt closer to death. He described Frazier as “the greatest fighter of all time, next to me.”

Frazier lost to Foreman one more time, in 1976, and attempted an early 1980s comeback, thankfully short-lived. He started a musical act, Smokin’ Joe and the Knockouts; that didn’t last long either. He opened up a gym in North Philadelphia, and like too many ex-fighters he fell on hard times. “Over the years, Frazier has lost a fortune through a combination of his own generosity and naïveté,” read a 2006 profile in the New York Times, “his carousing, failed business opportunities and deep hatred for his former chief boxing rival, Muhammad Ali.”

NYC: Madison Square Garden

by wallyg via Flickr

After their fighting days, Frazier matched Ali’s past unseemliness with some hurtful remarks of his own. “Look at him now,” Frazier told writer Thomas Hauser for his 1992 book on Ali. “He’s damaged goods. I know it; you know it. Everyone knows it … He was always making fun of me. I’m the dummy; I’m the one getting hit in the head. Tell me now, him or me: Which one talks worse now?” In 1996, after Ali lit the Olympic torch at the Atlanta Games, Frazier told a group of reporters, “I wish Ali had fallen into [the flame]. If I had the chance, I’d have pushed him in.” Such comments did not endear Frazier to any corporate sponsors.

But in recent years, Frazier’s bitterness faded. “Nobody has anything but
good things to say about Muhammad now,” Frazier told SI.com in 2009. “I’d do anything he needed for me to help.” A few years ago, the pair conducted a photo shoot together at Frazier’s gym, which is now shuttered. The day before Frazier’s death, Ali said in a statement: “My family and I are keeping Joe and his family in our daily prayers. Joe has a lot of friends pulling for him, and I’m one of them.”

Frazier lost this last fight. But in so many others, he thrilled the
world.

See TIME’s Ali and Frazier cover.
Read how Frazier was diagnosed with cancer.

Related articles

Sarkozy Calls Netanyahu A Liar

Sarkozy tells Obama Netanyahu is a “liar”

By Yann Le Guernigou | Reuters

PARIS (Reuters) – French President Nicolas Sarkozy branded Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu “a liar” in a private conversation with President Barack Obama that was accidentally broadcast to journalists during last week’s G20 summit in Cannes.

“I cannot bear Netanyahu, he’s a liar,” Sarkozy told Obama, unaware that the microphones in their meeting room had been switched on, enabling reporters in a separate location to listen in to a simultaneous translation.

“You’re fed up with him, but I have to deal with him even more often than you,” Obama replied, according to the French interpreter.

President Barack Obama meets with Israeli Prim...

The technical gaffe is likely to cause great embarrassment to all three leaders as they look to work together to intensify international pressure on Iran over its nuclear ambitions.

The conversation was not initially reported by the small group of journalists who overheard it because it was considered private and off-the-record. But the comments have since emerged on French websites and can be confirmed by Reuters.

White House press secretary Jay Carney declined to comment on the conversation when asked by reporters traveling with Obama to an event in Philadelphia.

Leaders arrival

Downing Street via Flickr

Obama’s apparent failure to defend Netanyahu is likely to be leapt on by his Republican foes, who are looking to unseat him in next year’s presidential election and have portrayed him as hostile to Israel, Washington’s closest ally in the region.

Pushing Netanyahu risks alienating Israel’s strong base of support among the U.S. public and in Congress.

Netanyahu’s office declined immediate comment.

Obama and Netanyahu have had a rocky relationship as U.S. efforts to broker a Middle East peace deal have foundered, with the U.S. president openly criticizing Jewish settlement building in the occupied Palestinian
territories.

It was unclear why exactly Sarkozy had criticized Netanyahu. However, European diplomats have largely blamed Israel for the breakdown in peace talks and have expressed anger over Netanyahu’s approval
of large-scale settlement building.

PALESTINIAN WORRIES

During their bilateral meeting on November 3, on the sidelines of the Cannes summit, Obama criticized Sarkozy’s surprise decision to vote in favor of a Palestinian request for membership of the U.N. cultural heritage agency UNESCO.

“I didn’t appreciate your way of presenting things over the Palestinian membership of UNESCO. It weakened us. You should have consulted us, but that is now behind us,” Obama was quoted as saying.

The October 31 UNESCO vote marked a success for the Palestinians in their broader thrust for recognition as a sovereign state in the U.N. system — a unilateral initiative fiercely opposed by Israel and the United States.

VIDEO…

As a result of the vote, Washington was compelled to halt its funding for UNESCO under a 1990s law that prohibits Washington from giving money to any U.N. body that grants membership to groups that do not have full, legal statehood.

Obama told Sarkozy that he was worried about the impact if Washington had to pull funding from other U.N. bodies such as the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization and the IAEA nuclear watchdog if the Palestinians gained membership there.

“You have to pass the message along to the Palestinians that they must stop this immediately,” Obama said.

The day the conversation took place, the Palestinians announced that they would not seek membership of any other U.N. agency.

Sarkozy confirmed that France would not take any unilateral decisions when the U.N. Security Council discusses a Palestinian membership request, a debate expected later this month.

“I am with you on that,” Obama replied.

(Writing by Crispian Balmer)

On This Date: November 8th

Nov 8, 1895:

German scientist discovers X-rays

On this day in 1895, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen (1845-1923) becomes the first person to observe X-rays, a significant scientific advancement that would ultimately benefit a variety of fields, most of all medicine, by making the invisible visible. Rontgen’s discovery occurred accidentally in his Wurzburg, Germany, lab, where he was testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass when he noticed a glow coming from a nearby chemically coated screen. He dubbed the rays that caused this glow X-rays because of their unknown nature.

X-ray image of the paranasal sinuses, lateral ...

X-rays are electromagnetic energy waves that act similarly to light rays, but at wavelengths approximately 1,000 times shorter than those of light. Rontgen holed up in his lab and conducted a series of experiments to better understand his discovery. He learned that X-rays penetrate human flesh but not higher-density substances such as bone or lead and that they can be photographed.

Rontgen’s discovery was labeled a medical miracle and X-rays soon became an important diagnostic tool in medicine, allowing doctors to see inside the human body for the first time without surgery. In 1897, X-rays were first used on a military battlefield, during the Balkan War, to find bullets and broken bones inside patients.

Scientists were quick to realize the benefits of X-rays, but slower to comprehend the harmful effects of radiation. Initially, it was believed X-rays passed through flesh as harmlessly as light. However, within several years, researchers began to report cases of burns and skin damage after exposure to X-rays, and in 1904, Thomas Edison’s assistant, Clarence Dally, who had worked extensively with X-rays, died of skin cancer. Dally’s death caused some scientists to begin taking the risks of radiation more seriously, but they still weren’t fully understood. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, in fact, many American shoe stores featured shoe-fitting fluoroscopes that used to X-rays to enable customers to see the bones in their feet; it wasn’t until the 1950s that this practice was determined to be risky business. Wilhelm Rontgen received numerous accolades for his work, including the first Nobel Prize in physics in 1901, yet he remained modest and never tried to patent his discovery. Today, X-ray technology is widely used in medicine, material analysis and devices such as airport security scanners.

Also on This Day

American Revolution
Washington seeks to make militias into a military, 1775
Automotive
Sun sets on the Ford Rotunda, 1962
Civil War
President Lincoln is re-elected, 1864
Cold War
John F. Kennedy elected president, 1960
Crime
Ted Bundy botches an abduction attempt, 1974
Disaster
Hurricane Gordon is born, 1994
General Interest
Louvre Museum opens, 1793
Beer Hall Putsch begins, 1923
The Republican Revolution, 1994
Hollywood
Dracula creator Bram Stoker born, 1847
Literary
Margaret Mitchell is born, 1900
Music
Salvatore “Sonny” Bono is elected to the U.S. Congress, 1994
Old West
Doc Holliday dies of tuberculosis, 1887
Presidential
FDR broadcasts message to Vichy France leader Marshal Petain, 1942
Sports
Yogi Berra is the AL MVP, 1951
Vietnam War
Lawrence Joel earns Medal of Honor, 1965
World War I
New Russian leader Lenin calls for immediate armistice, 1917
World War II
Hitler survives assassination attempt, 1939

This Week in History, Nov 8 – Nov 14

Nov 08, 1895
German scientist discovers X-rays
Nov 09, 1938
Nazis launch Kristallnacht
Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts
Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends
Nov 12, 1954
Ellis Island closes
Nov 13, 1982
Vietnam Veterans Memorial dedicated
Nov 14, 1851
Moby-Dick published

The Straight Scoop On SEALs Bin Laden Operation

Correcting the ‘fairy tale’:
A SEAL’s account of how Osama bin Laden really died

The Daily Caller

Forget whatever you think you know about the night Osama bin Laden was killed. According to a former Navy SEAL who claims to have the
inside track, the mangled tales told of that historic night have only now been corrected.

A still of 2004 Osama bin Laden video

“It became obvious in the weeks evolving after the mission that the story that was getting put out there was not only untrue, but it was a really ugly farce of what did happen,” said Chuck Pfarrer, author of Seal Target Geronimo: The Inside Story of the Mission to Kill Osama Bin Laden.

In an extensive interview with The Daily Caller, Pfarrer gave a detailed account of why he believes the record needed to be corrected, and why he set out to share the personal stories of the warriors who penetrated
bin Laden’s long-secret compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

In August the New Yorker delivered a riveting blow-by-blow of the SEALs’ May 1, 2011 raid on bin Laden’s hideaway. In that account, later reported to lack contributions from the SEALs involved, readers are taken through a mission that began with a top-secret helicopter crashing and led to a bottom-up assault of the Abbottabad compound.

In this file photo, Soldiers from 2nd Battalio...

Freelancer Nicholas Schmidle wrote that the SEALs had shot and blasted their way up floor-by-floor, finally cornering the bewildered Al-Qaida leader:

“The Al Qaeda chief, who was wearing a tan shalwar kameez and a prayer cap on
his head, froze; he was unarmed. ‘There was never any question of detaining or
capturing him—it wasn’t a split-second decision. No one wanted detainees,’ the
special-operations officer told me. (The Administration maintains that had bin
Laden immediately surrendered he could have been taken alive.) Nine years, seven
months, and twenty days after September 11th, an American was a trigger pull
from ending bin Laden’s life. The first round, a 5.56-mm. bullet, struck bin
Laden in the chest. As he fell backward, the SEAL fired a second round into his
head, just above his left eye.”

Chuck Pfarrer rejects almost all of that story.

“The version of the 45-minute firefight, and the ground-up assault, and the cold-blooded murder on the third floor — that wasn’t the mission,” Pfarrer told TheDC.

“I had to try and figure out, well, look: Why is this story not what I’m
hearing? Why is it so off and how is it so off?” he recounted. “One of the
things I sort of determined was, OK, somebody was told ‘one of the insertion helicopters crashed.’ OK, well that got muddled to ‘a helicopter crashed on insertion.’”

Hamid Mir interviewing Osama bin Laden for Dai...

The helicopters, called “Stealth Hawks,” are inconspicuous machines
concealing cutting-edge technology. They entered the compound as planned, with “Razor 1″ disembarking its team of SEALs on the roof of the compound — not on the ground level. There was no crash landing. That wouldn’t occur until after bin Laden was dead.

Meanwhile, “Razor 2″ took up a hovering position so that its on-board snipers, some of whom had also participated in the sea rescue of
Maersk Alabama captain Richard Phillips, had a clear view of anyone fleeing the compound.

The SEALs then dropped down from the roof, immediately penetrated the third floor, and hastily encountered bin Laden in his room. He was not standing still.

“He dived across the king-size bed to get at the AKSU rifle he kept by the
headboard,” wrote Pfarrer in his book. It was at that moment, a mere 90 seconds after the SEALs first set foot on the roof, that two American bullets shattered bin Laden’s chest and head, killing a man who sought violence to the very end.

A policeman walks in front of the compound where al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed in Abbottabad

Photo By REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood/REUTERS

President Obama stepped up to a podium in the East Room of the White House that night to announce bin Laden’s death. That rapid announcement, explained Pfarrer, posed a major threat to U.S. national security.

“There was a choice that night,” Pfarrer told TheDC. “There was a choice to keep the mission secret.” America, Pfarrer explained, could have left things alone for “weeks or months … even though there was evidence left on the ground there … and use the intelligence and finish off al-Qaida.”

But Obama’s announcement, he said, “rendered moot all of the intelligence that was gathered from the nexus of al-Qaida. The computer drives, the hard drives, the videocasettes, the CDs, the thumb drives, everything. Before that could even be looked through, the political decision was made to take credit for the operation.”

FILE - In this May 2, 2011 file photo taken by a local resident, the wreckage of a helicopter next to the wall of the compound where according to officials, Osama bin Laden was shot and killed in a fi

Photo By Mohammad Zubair, File

And in the days that followed, as politicians sought to thrust their
identities into the details of the bin Laden kill, the tale began to grow out of control, said Pfarrer.

“The president made a statement, and as far as that goes, that was fine, that was the mission statement,” he explained. “But, soon after … politicians began leaking information from every orifice. And it was like a game of Chinese telephone. These guys didn’t know what they were talking about. Very few of them had even seen the video feed.”

Pfarrer suggests that much of the misinformation was likely born out of
operational ignorance, even among those sitting in the White House.

“One of the things that happened was that there were only a handful of people who know about this mission,” he said. “On the civilian side, there were only a handful of people in the situation room who were watching the drone feed. They were looking at the roof of a building taken from a rotating aircraft at 35,000 feet.”

Aerial view of Osama bin Laden's compound in the pakistani city of Abbottabad made by the CIA.

“None of those guys, not a single one of them, had a background in special operations, with the exception of General Webb who was sitting there running a laptop,” Pfarrer went on. “No one knew or could even imagine what was going on inside the building. They didn’t know.”

“There was an alternative feed going to CIA headquarters where Leon Panetta sat there with the communications brevity codes [a guide sheet for the mission’s radio lingo] in his lap and a SEAL off-screen by his side to be able to tell him what was going on,” he said. “But these guys, none of them, really knew what they were looking at.”

As the media raised more questions, officials gave more answers.

Whether or not bin Laden resisted ultimately developed into a barrage of
murky official and unofficial explanations in the days following. And statements from as high as then-CIA Director Leon Panetta offered confirmation that the endeavor was a “kill mission.”

Pfarrer dismisses that assertion.

“An order to go in and murder someone in their house is not a lawful order,” explained Pfarrer, who maintains that bin Laden would have been captured had he surrendered. “Unlike the Germans in World War II, if you’re a petty officer, a chief petty officer, a naval officer, and you’re giving an order to murder somebody, that’s an unlawful order.”

Pfarrer also suggests some of the emerging claims were simply
self-aggrandizing “fairy tales.”

“The story they tried to tell — it’s preposterous. And the CIA tried to jump
in. About mid-June the CIA tried to jump into the car and drive the victory lap. There’s this whole stuff about the CIA guy joining the operation, the gallant interpreter — he couldn’t even fast rope!” exclaimed Pfarrer, referring to a technique for descending from an airborne helicopter.

“There’s this fairy tale about him walking out of the compound during the
operation to tell crowds of Pakistanis to go home and everything’s OK.”

Pfarrer tried to put this in perspective: “Do you mean that during the middle of this military operation at night, with hovering helicopters over this odd house in this neighborhood, that people came out of their houses to ask what’s going on, instead of [remaining] huddled in their basement?”

“And I think that there were so many of these leaks that were incorrect, the administration couldn’t walk them all back,” Pfarrer explained. “And so, in the middle of May, they froze everything.”

It was that freeze-out that left Chuck Pfarrer with nowhere to turn for the
real story but the SEALs themselves.

Seal Target Geronimo delivers an account of the night Osama bin Laden died with a level of detail unlike anything previously reported. Pfarrer bills the story as “absolutely factual.”

“That’s the other thing. I’m prepared for the White House to say, you know, ‘this is full of inaccuracies,’ et cetera,” offered Pfarrer. He told TheDC that in order to protect American interests, his book is “full of names that are made up, and it is full of bases that are not quite where they really should be.”

“But the timeline of my events,” he cautions, “and the manner in which it happened is 100 percent accurate. And they’ll know that.”

Follow Vince on Twitter

Read more stories from The Daily Caller

Correcting the ‘fairy tale’: A SEAL’s account of how Osama bin Laden really died

$19 A Month Wireless- Say Whaaat?

Disruptive $19/Month Carrier Republic Wireless To Sell Handsets For $99 Until November 27

Last week we broke the news that Bandwidth.com was launching a disruptive mobile carrier called Republic Wireless. The service will use special handsets that take advantage of Wifi networks whenever possible, and will fallback to a ‘normal’ cellular connection whenever Wifi isn’t available. A report from GigaOM pegs the price at a mere $19 per month — with unlimited text, data, and voice.
Wifi network

Image via Wikipedia

That’s massive savings compared to the standard contracts offered by Verizon, AT&T, et al. But there’s a catch: to use Republic Wireless, you need to buy a new handset (the devices are Android-based, but they use a special combination of hardware and software that can’t be ported to other devices, at least not yet). Thankfully those handsets are going to be relatively inexpensive.

Numerous tipsters have written in to say they’ve just received the following email from Republic Wireless — and we’ve just confirmed with the company — that the handsets will be $99 for anyone who uses the code ‘welcome19′ by November 27. And that’s with no contract. After that early-signup period ends, the price will jump to $199, which is still significantly less expensive than most off-contract phones. Update: The code is welcome19, with a lowercase w — it won’t work if you use a capital letter.

Initially, Republic Wireless will be using Sprint as its fallback when Wifi isn’t available, but it sounds like it’s working to offer service from other carriers as well. Here’s the email that is starting to land in some early users’ inboxes — the service’s homepage is advertising a full launch tomorrow:

Welcome to republic wireless.

So what’s it like here?

A reward for being first:
Join now, and pay $99. That’s $100 less than the normal $199 cost. You read that right. For $99 you get a new smartphone, and a whole new kind of mobile phone network.

Freedom isn’t free. It’s $19.
Almost immediately you notice what’s missing. The hefty monthly bills, the endless nickel-and-diming, the big red contracts…yes, we can hear you now. Do you hear us? With republic wireless, you pay a flat $19 a month for everything. Period.

How is that possible?
republic is a Wi-Fi network. Anything cellular can do, Wi-Fi can do better (and for less). That’s 21st Century technology. That’s also basic economics. So let’s all use Wi-Fi as much as possible.

Change the way wireless works
Decide whether to become a member now, or maybe later. Either way, like minds for evolving the industry are wanted here, today. You have thoughts to share, ideas to spread. Bring them to our forums. Keep up with us via our blog. Tell the republic what’s up.

Next stop: republicwireless.com
There’s so much more we have to show you. So visit, look around. Oh, that $99 offer we told you about? To get it, use the code welcome19 to join before November 27, 2011 at 11:59 pm ET.

Looking forward to being your new wireless network!

Yours,
republic wireless

 

 
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DIY Multi-Sectional Curved Couch

Cool Curved Couch: Design Your Own Custom Sectional Sofa

Like a life-sized LEGO or tinker-toy set, this do-it-yourself modern sectional lets you wrap and twist one, two, three or more modules together in all kinds of clever and unique formations to suit any living or dining room space (and double as a sleeper as well).

Unlike many of its contemporary equivalents every part of these pieces comes into play, from the fronts and backs to the back rests and legs – arm supports morph into leaning surfaces and transform back again. Bright-colored accent pieces (ottomans and other accessories) can be set up to contrast with the stark whites and blacks or mellow grays and browns of the main sofa elements.

One could even imagine cool modular configurations in which the whole snake-like couch form stretches from one room into the next, connecting people across various rooms during parties or even for everyday use depending upon the particular plan and layout of a home and its existing furnishings. Forget one-piece, two-piece or three-piece variants – really, one of these could go on forever.

From Dornob

Image Of The Day- “The Witches Promise”

Image

“The Witches Promise”
by Charles Oliver

witchespromise

"The Witches Promise" by Charles Oliver

Click image to view full size…

For more art by the artist visit…
Charles Oliver Art – Contemporary Art
The Shenandoah Collection – Traditional Fine Art