Look Out! Here Comes The Sperm Bike

Sperm bike comes to Seattle

Anthony Bolante / Reuters

Biological analyst Alan Dowden of the Seattle Sperm Bank rides the Sperm Bike, a custom-designed, high-tech bicycle used to deliver donated sperm to fertility clinics, in Seattle Nov. 8, 2011.

Anthony Bolante / Reuters

Biological analyst Alan Dowden of the Seattle Sperm Bank places a transportation container aboard the Sperm Bike, a custom-designed, high-tech bicycle used to deliver donated sperm to fertility clinics, in Seattle, Nov. 8, 2011.

From MarketWire:

Seattle has become the second city to showcase a ‘sperm bike’ making sperm  deliveries from a sperm bank to fertility clinics. The European Sperm Bank, one  of the largest in Europe and located in Copenhagen, Denmark — perhaps the  world’s most bike-friendly city — made news reports globally after it began  deliveries in a custom-designed bike with a cooling system built inside the  ‘sperm head‘ for storing tanks with sperm specimens.

The company’s CEO,  Peter Bower, says, “The first idea was how we could deliver to the fertility  clinics in a CO2-friendly way. Then we realized that the bike could promote both  cycling and the need for donors to help childless families around the world.”

The European Sperm Bank’s Seattle lab (www.europeanspermbankusa.com)  worked with Portland’s Splendid Cycles and Antimatter.com to construct the sperm  structure, built of Jesmonite on top of a Bullitt cargo bike. With the tail, the  bike is 9 1/2 feet long and weighs about 110 pounds fully loaded. The Seattle  version includes a small electrical motor to give riders a boost on Seattle’s  many hills (unlike flat Copenhagen, where the assist is not needed).

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Naked Pumpkins and Peoplekins Too

Get ready for the naked pumpkin people, Seattle

What is it with Seattle and getting naked? It’s not warm here, it’s not a
particularly nudist-friendly city — yet several times a year like clockwork,
people strip off their clothes and run (or ride bikes) through the streets.

These pumkins have no clothes on! (Getty Images)

This before-Halloween weekend will have plenty of nudity. And plenty of
pumpkins. Together.

Let me explain: The naked people will wear the pumpkins on their heads as they dash through two Seattle neighborhoods over the next few days.

Boulder Naked Pumpkin Run
Image by the crofts via Flickr

There’s a daytime naked pumpkin run in Fremont at 11:11 a.m. on Saturday, and a nighttime run in the Greenlake neighborhood at 9:21 p.m Monday.

Feeling a little shy but still want to participate? Nudity is optional, organizers wrote online:

Go as bare as you dare! The event is clothing-optional, nudity is not mandatory. However, most people prefer to go nude or topfree, especially when considering the anonymity of wearing a pumpkin-head mask.

To find out where to meet up for the runs, you should be at the pumpkin-carving party Saturday.

Visit seattlepi.com’s home page for more Seattle news. Contact
Amy Rolph at amyrolph@seattlepi.com or on Twitter as @amyrolph and @bigblog.

Full Bags, Big Candy Bars- Top 10 Trick or Treat Cities

Story contributed by a Blaoggo Schloggo subscriber

Forbes: America’s 10 Best Cities For Trick-Or-Treating

Best Cities For Trick-Or-Treating

Kids are always looking for ways to maximize Halloween returns, so why not start with the best neighborhoods? Based on data culled by Zillow’s real-estate gurus, here’s a list of the cities and top neighborhoods where residents can score hoard-worthy goodies without too much footwork. San Francisco topped this year’s list, followed by Boston in the number-two spot, and Honolulu at number three. (Photo: Ariel Skelley/Getty Images)

10. Portland, Oregon

1. Laurelhurst
2. Irvington
3. East Moreland
4. Sellwood/Moreland
5. Rose City Park
(Photo: Karen Massier/istockphoto)

9. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1. Chestnut Hill
2. West Mount Airy
3. Roxborough
4. Center City
5. Manyunk
(Photo: Jeremy Edwards/istockphoto)

8. Los Angeles, California

1. Westwood
2. Brentwood
3. Pacific Palisades
4. Bel Air
5. Venice
(Photo: Daniel Stein/istockphoto)

7. Washington, D.C.

1. West End
2. Kalorama
3. Street Corridor
4. Georgetown
5. Dupont Circle
(Photo: Tom Williams/Roll Call Photos/Newscom)

6. San Jose, California

1. Almaden Valley
2. Willow Glen
3. Cambrian Park
4. Rose Garden
5. Santa Teresa
(Photo: Terry Wilson/istockphoto)

5. Chicago, Illinois

1. Gold Coast
2. Roscoe Village
3. Ravenswood Manor
4. Wrigleyville
5. Bucktown
(Photo: Pawel Gaul/istockphoto)

4. Seattle, Washington

1. Madison Park
2. Queen Anne
3. Ballard
4. Laurelhurst
5. Wallingford
(Photo: Jeremy Edwards/istockphoto)


3. Honolulu, Hawaii

1. Kuliouou-Kalani Iki
2. Kaimuki
3. Waialae-Kahala
4. Manoa
5. Kapahulu
(Photo: Philip Dyer/istockphoto)

2. Boston, Massachusetts

1. Beacon Hill
2. Back Bay
3. North End
4. South End
5. Kenmore
(Photo: Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

1. San Francisco, California

1. Presidio Heights
2. Cow Hollow
3. South Beach
4. Sea Cliff
5. Pacific Heights
(Photo: Teresa Guerrero/istockphoto)
To see more cities and neighborhoods that are great for
trick-or-treating, click here.
Photo of a Halloween trick-or-treater, Redford...

More From Forbes:
America’s Doomed Mansions
The Strangest And Most Unusual Homes For Sale
America’s Best Downtowns

Jack-o-latern

A Bit Bizarre- Controversial Public Art Displays

Top 5 bizarre public art displays

By Lili Ladaga | Wanderlust

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and one could say the same about art. Check out these top 5 bizarre public art displays and you decide what’s art and what’s … not.

5) Broadway Dance Steps, Seattle, Wash.: If you’ve ever felt the urge to break out into dance while walking down the street, you’ll right at home at the Broadway Dance Steps. Located in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, amateurs can learn how to dance the tango, foxtrot or
rumba on bronze shoe prints on the sidewalk. The foot prints are numbered and arranged like dance steps, so even if you have two left feet, you’ll look like Gene Kelly.

4) SunFlowers, Austin, Texas: Like flowers but don’t have a green thumb? What about an electric one instead? SunFlowers is a public art display “Electric Garden” in Austin, Texas. It features a “crop” of 18 to 24-foot high photovoltaic sculptures that soak up the sun during the day and use that energy to glow brightly at night.

3) Blue Mustang, Denver, Colorado: Critics have choice words for the sculpture at Denver International Airport: heinous, uninviting, creepy, evil. But even they can’t deny that the giant rearing mustang is eye-catching. The 32-foot-high “Blue Mustang” is made out of polished blue steel, with fiery eyes and is, ahem, anatomically correct.

2) Bus Home, Ventura, Calif.: If you’ve ever wondered where old buses go to die, well, they don’t end up at Bus Home. This 36-foot-high sculpture looks more like bus purgatory: The twisty, turny, soaring piece of art was created in 2002 by artist Dennis Oppenheim. It depicts a bus evolving into a home — or is it the other way around?

1) Crown Fountain, Chicago, Ill.: Forget about looking at art; at Chicago’s Crown Fountain, you can BE the art. The interactive video sculpture features LED screens that display 50-foot photos of Chicago locals; actual water flows out of the screens, making it look like water is flowing out of their mouths. Art or not, it’s certainly nothing you’ll ever see in a museum.

Super Hero Vigilante Crime Fighter Locked Up

Seattle “superhero” charged with pepper-spray assault

ReutersBy Nicole Neroulias | Reuters

SEATTLE (Reuters) – Self-proclaimed Seattle superhero Phoenix Jones, a vigilante crime fighter, is due in court on Thursday to face charges that he assaulted a group of people with pepper spray outside a nightclub.

The costumed defendant, whose real name is Benjamin John Francis
Fodor, 23, has become something of a local celebrity since he began
patrolling downtown Seattle streets nearly a year ago to break up fights and alert police to petty crimes in progress, such as drunken driving and car burglaries.

Seattle Police Arrest 'Superhero' Phoenix Jone...

Image by ssoosay via Flickr

 

Disguised by a hooded mask and wearing a molded black-and-yellow suit of body armor, Fodor carries pepper spray, a Taser stun gun and a cell phone as he makes his late-night rounds. He also attends charity events on request.

Fodor has been joined on some exploits by any number of fellow freelance crime fighters who assume such alter egos as No Name
and Thorn in a collective that bills itself as the “Rain City Superheroes Movement.”

Fodor was accused of going too far when he encountered a group of men and women outside a club in the early hours of Sunday morning. According to a police report, the group were walking to their car,
“dancing and having a good time,” when Fodor “came up from behind and pepper-sprayed the group.”

Two men in the group chased Fodor, and police called to the scene “separated the involved parties,” the report said. Fodor was
booked into the King County Jail on four counts of assault and was released on $3,800 bail on Sunday afternoon.

RSG-3

Image via Wikipedia

 

Fodor has since sent out Twitter messages saying he was back on patrol and proclaiming himself innocent of wrongdoing.

 

“I WOULD NEVER ASSAULT OR HURT ANOTHER PERSON IF THEY WERE NOT CAUSING HARM TO ANOTHER HUMAN BEING,” he wrote in one tweet.

Thirteen minutes of shaky video footage taken by supporters to document Sunday’s incident (http://vimeo.com/30307440), and posted online, shows Fodor being alerted to a “huge fight,” then rushing on foot to the scene yelling, “call 911.”

He wades into a group of people with a can of pepper spray as they scatter, yelling and cursing. Pandemonium ensues with several individuals chasing after Fodor and a masked sidekick. One woman is seen repeatedly beating Fodor with her shoes and screaming at him in the street before police finally arrive.

Fodor was charged with four counts of misdemeanor assault and faces up to a year in jail and a $5,000 fine if convicted. A court hearing was set for Thursday.

(Writing by Steve Gorman; Editing by Cynthia Johnston)